The Trojan War: Chronological, Historical and Archaeological Evidence
Field of study
Arts and Humanities
Classics
Ancient History (Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity)
The Trojan War: Chronological, Historical and Archaeological Evidence
The Trojan War: Chronological, Historical and Archaeological Evidence
Gerard Gertoux
Field of study
Arts and Humanities
Classics
Ancient History (Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity)
$9.57
ADD TO CART

The Trojan War is the foundation of Greek history. If Greek historians had little doubt of its existence they remained extremely sceptical regarding its mythological origin. Archaeology has confirmed one essential point: there was indeed a general conflagration in the Greek world around 1200 BCE, the assumed period of that war, which caused the disappearance of two powerful empires: Mycenaean on one hand and Hittite with its vassals on the other hand. The inscriptions of Ramses III's year 8 describe actually a general invasion of the Mediterranean by the "Sea Peoples", but without giving any reason. A precise chronological reconstruction, based on a few absolute dates, shows that the annexation of the kingdom of Cyprus (Alašia), closely linked to the Mycenaean world, by Hittite King Tudhaliya IV played a role of detonator in the confrontation between a Greek heterogeneous confederation, consisting of pirates and privateers on one side and a set of vassal kingdoms of the Hittite empire, such as Troy and Ugarit, on the other. This struggle to control a vital sea path, from Crete to Egypt, via Cyprus, which ended with a complete mutual destruction in 1185 BCE, the climax of the famous Trojan War, had begun 10 years earlier. Surprisingly, this conclusion was already that of Eratosthenes. Historical and epigraphic context shows that Homer wrote his epic shortly after Queen Elissa founded Carthage (c. 870 BCE).

Copyright 2016, Gertoux
Copyright License Standard Copyright License
Product Details 8.27 x 11.69 Standard Color Glossy Perfect Bound
Page Count 202 pages
Type of Publication Monograph (standalone)
Keywords The trojan war
Audience University/Post-secondary education
Coming soon